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What is the most difficult piece of feedback you have ever received? How has that shaped your approach as a sales leader?

๐Ÿงข Sales Management
๐Ÿ“š Resource
๐Ÿ˜Ž Sales Skills
23
Ace
Arsonist
+9
CEO
One of my colleagues told me that I don't let the other person finish the question and just jump into answering it. And yes I do that because halfway through I understand the question and just dive in. I have been practicing patience since in other places as well. Which allows me to have patience here. Now I really listen to people and only respond once they're done. I also take my time with responding. I don't jump in a fast pace ramble but talk slowly and patiently thinking before saying
TheFemaleWolf
Opinionated
+3
Director of Sales
Exact same for me! So tough. Another tool to help manage this is to sit on your hands when you want to speak. It actually works. My executive coach helped me focus on impulsivity and its professional impacts. This was one weird but useful takeaway!!
Ace
Arsonist
+9
CEO
That's an interesting approach? But how do you sit on your hands specially if you are with some other people in the room. It would be weird. Maybe I'm missing something?
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Beercules
Politicker
+2
BDR
Yeah I was told a similar thing after an interview for a job that I did not get in the end. When talking to a friend about it - they said that the best advice their mother gave them was that we have two ears and one mouth for a reason. Listen twice as much as you speak.

Ace
Arsonist
+9
CEO
Best advice ever!
Incognito
Arsonist
+9
Master of Disaster
I need to hear this.

Like 373748756865896590 times.
sa
saleskick
Opinionated
+1
Sales Specialist
I remember one when my previous boss told me - "You suck at closing, you need to get better!" 5 weeks after that he was fired due to the poor performance :xDย 
hauru.sales
Arsonist
+8
Sales Enthusiast
Well deserved!ย 
HoldemCaulfield
Politicker
+8
Sales Training & Enablement
One of my sales managers said, "Your presentation skills need work. I get the sense that the reps don't trust you like they used to when you were on the same level with them."

This made me very conscious of how I was presented myself when doing trainings for the sales team. I had previously done really well with an empathetic sales approach when speaking with prospects because it was all about THEM talking and not me. I was able to listen and gauge my questions to reveal pain and talk about value. Not only this, but I would record ever call that I had and listen back to it (within reason --- generally those that were over a few minutes to 30 minutes). This helped me be aware of my tone and make sure that I had the correct information instead of relying on in situation notes that I had taken.

What was most difficult about hearing this feedback was the fact that my own internal sales colleagues found a lack of trust or usefulness in what I was presenting to them (i.e. of no value). This is never good to hear. I think the other difficult part was that my sales manager didn't really offer any help.

I used the same tactics that I did when I was speaking to prospects to help me get better: deliberate practice through recording my presentations and running them by one or two trusted reps beforehand. Additionally, I found that TED talks were really helpful in getting to the point and providing true value.ย 

Resources that helped and for anyone interested in leveling up their speaking/presentation game:

TED Talk Book + Google Talk from Carmine Gallo:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFTPyvO6kcY

Really practical guide on how to avoid shitty ppt presentations aka Frankendecks:
https://info.presentation-company.com/everyday-business-storytelling
hauru.sales
Arsonist
+8
Sales Enthusiast
Thanks you so much!
poweredbycaffeine
Politicker
+7
Bean Juice Drinker | Sales Savant
I was told that I do not give space for personal creativity in solving problems. Right away I started to catch myself hearing someone propose a solution to a problem and I'd start cutting them off because it was not the most simple way to attack it, which probably made them feel devalued and discouraged from sharing their opinions. Since then I have made sure to hear people out completely, pressure test their ideas, and even adopt some of the ones that I personally wouldn't choose.
Telehealth_2the_Moon
Notable Contributor
+12
Director of Business Development
"I'd rather you say 'I don't know' than to guess and be wrong"
Kinonez
Arsonist
+8
Team Lead
I love to pitch, heโ€™ll Iโ€™m
good at it, and I always thought it was on point, even โ€œperfectโ€.

It wasnโ€™t the case, my boss got fired, got appointed a new manager (now a great friend) and he asked me to pitch which I did with pride and a bit of overconfidence, I was cocky.

The first thing he said after I gave him the greatest pitch, were 2 words. โ€œToo salesyโ€. After a few seconds had passed of me being silent and processing what he said, said one word; โ€œagainโ€.ย 

Now my pitch has improved wonders and yet itโ€™s not perfect, it never will be, Iโ€™ll keep improving everyday.
SA
SADNES5
Politicker
+6
Business Development
"You're awkward in your rapport building"

At that point, I stopped trying to fit a mold, and follow advice. I landed and am successful in my role for being me. No longer was I bound to the "process". I still follow it, just with less hard triggers.ย 

My personality shines when I have no reigns, give me a budget and a target and I'll deliver. Tell me key highlights from what is new, and I can sell it.ย 

The awkward came from trying to fit my personality into another model. It's one of those square peg round hole situations.ย 

Be myself. Don't pretend to be anything else.ย 
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