The War Room
Question
Post

Will you help me Close this Deal?

I have a deal that the guy can save immediate money but we can't save him a ton for about 3 years because we would be absorbing his existing contract as well as putting him into new equipment. I read Sahil's post on chasing dead deals. Everytime we get ahold of him he says he needs more time to talk things over with his IT department.


How can I get this guy to close? It has been a month now he has been "thinking it over."

🎈 Mentorship
📈 Closing
24
mrsexyspizza
Politicker
+7
Mid Market AE
I'd say give him an out - if he's not serious, he will take it. If he's serious, he will give you his true objection.
softwaresails
Politicker
+4
Sales Manager
I like this. Especially utilizing the negative reverse. 
GrindingSales
Opinionated
+5
Account Executive
Probably going to do this today and see how I land.  Wish me luck!
Show 4 more replies
SaaSbod
Contributor
+3
Sr Sales Account Exec
I've used this a lot. Goes something like "Normally when someone is thinking about something for a month that means XXXX or XXXX, is that that case here?" and 9 of 10 times the real objection is admitted.
GrindingSales
Opinionated
+5
Account Executive
I want to do this.  My hesitation: if I lose them will my bosses be pissed at me for being aggressive?  But I don't want to keep hope-casting this account I guess.
mrsexyspizza
Politicker
+7
Mid Market AE
They will be more pissed off if you inaccurately forecast it 🙂
Show 4 more replies
southernfriedsales
Opinionated
+8
Senior AE & Business Owner
Giving him an out will also probably identity he’s not the true DM. 
sahil
Notable Contributor
+15
Deepak Chopra of Sales
Actual Decision Makers do just that: they MAKE decisions. Anytime you have a prospect who says they need "more time to talk things over", it's a massive red flag that you aren't talking to the real decision maker. 

Now, what's interesting is: this isn't always related to seniority! Salespeople assume that if the Director of Marketing isn't buying, that they need to go talk to the VP Marketing. While that's sometimes true, there are plenty of times that the holdup is coming from a peer or even a subordinate. 

Here's a real example: Glassdoor had been trying to break in AMD for years. The Director of Recruiting's last email response (nearly 10 months prior) was: "Do not ever contact me again." So the account was marked Closed Lost - DNC. 

I took over the lead and did some research. Found that there was a Technical Recruiting Manager who reported into this person. Had a conversation with her, she confirmed that yes, the DoR was the right POC but that he reported into the VP of HR. The VP of HR was NOT involved in recruiting, but might be a softer ear to get into.

So I went from Recruiting Manager to the VP of HR directly. The VP agreed to meet with me after I cited that we were working with NVIDIA, and to bring the "appropriate people" to the meeting. When I showed up in Austin, TX the next week... there was the Director of Recruiting! 

He was NOT looking pleased at this development. But rather than avoid the elephant in the room, I took it on head-on: "Hey (name), I know you were pitched by Glassdoor last year and didn't find value in our services. But we've launched a brand new product focused exclusively on hiring technical talent, and we've got NVIDIA, Microsoft, and Facebook on as customers in just the past 3 months. Are you open to giving us a look with fresh eyes?"

He agreed, we became fast friends...and he not only became one of our biggest customers, but also left to another massive techco 2 years later and rebought from me again. I still remain friends with him to this day :)

TLDR - Decision makers make decisions. But sometimes you gotta find a way around to get them into the room.
sahil
Notable Contributor
+15
Deepak Chopra of Sales
So what would I suggest you do in this case @GrindingSales ? Simple: Just reach out to said IT Team yourself. Mention that you've had a conversation with your guy, and that you'd like to walk them through the proposal directly. I'd try to mention a couple relevant companies that you work w/ as clients, and how you saved them money AND helped make them more successful. 

If you have a good relationship w/ the prospect, I'd cc him on the email. If not, just send it without it. 

And if you're scared of losing the deal... let me be clear: You are NEVER going to get this deal closed if you don't do the work for him. If he was gonna talk to his IT team and get them onboard, he would have done it already. It's time to put on your big boy/girl pants and get to work. 

It takes courage to get deals done. May the odds be ever in your favor.
GrindingSales
Opinionated
+5
Account Executive
It is an honor to share this War Room with you and your thoughts are greatly appreciated! I’m going to do just that! Thank you so much and will report back! 
Show 1 more replies
antiASKHOLE
Politicker
+8
Inside Sales Lead
I think he is yanking your chain. If he isn't wanting to say yes, then it's one of two things. 

1. Just not interested
2. Doesn't see the value with you. 

It doesn't always come down to the price. That is way too surface level in most cases. 

Give us more information as to why price is a thing for them. Any pain?
GrindingSales
Opinionated
+5
Account Executive
Price of their existing contract is a huge pain and him as the new GM is deplored at the fact this contract was ever signed.  A member of their golf course was the acting account rep at the time and pretty much railroaded them.  I can save them immediate money now and even more 3 years down the road.  But is that worth it to them to save money now and be in good hands or just keep on paying for the ridiculous contract. 
antiASKHOLE
Politicker
+8
Inside Sales Lead
Look down @BigMeech’s response/questions. I get they might have been railroaded, but if price really was the only pain or a big enough one, then they would have moved forward already. There has to be something more.
Show 3 more replies
CoorsKing
WR Officer
+12
King of the Coors Knights
What level is he? How strong is your exec alignment here? When stuff like this happens to me I normally go back to the exec this rolls to (CIO, CISO, CTO, etc) and just have a candid convo with them.

I obviously have 0 context into the deal but if the only value prop is saving money I would say maybe try to expand the business case you are attaching to?

What happens if they do nothing? Other than saving money, why would they go with your solution today?
GrindingSales
Opinionated
+5
Account Executive
BigMeech, i'm a big fan of your content!  With that said, I'm in the copier equipment industry so most of the time I don't believe there can be much value added with that other than saving money.  Only other things I have to offer are display boards or IT Services, both of which I am just taking more money from him and not giving him much in return. 

Should I just ask him straight up, what he needs to close this deal? 
antiASKHOLE
Politicker
+8
Inside Sales Lead
I think that if you need to straight up ask him this late in the game, you missed it at the beginning. 

A good way to back track is ask how they got their business and how/if they have followed through on their commitments. 

Show 4 more replies
Beefany28
Politicker
+6
Account Executive
I think that if there was enough of a pain. He would do it! 
OhhhhhhSnap
Opinionated
+1
Business Development Manager
For people like this I always send what I call a "less than 10 word email". Keep it simple and straight to the point. 99% of the time they will answer: yes, no, and worst case - whatever their excuse is (I'm on vacation, or I need CEO approval, etc). 

" Do you still want <service/product> for <name of business>?"

<your first name>
southernfriedsales
Opinionated
+8
Senior AE & Business Owner
He’s not the actual decision maker. Sadly.

Call that IT department he keeps mentioning and see what’s up? 

Sounds like y’all have had more than enough conversations for it to make sense….
mel
NAM Account Executive
For champions/influencers/internal sellers, etc. its good to get to their specific objection ("someone else needs to check this out" is often "I don't want to sell this to my team and I am using this excuse to avoid it...") There lots of options, one my CRO uses and I have since stolen:

"Hey ___, you've been at Company X for ___ and you've got a good pulse on the organization. I want to hear from you, do you think this is the right direction for the company?"

1. Acknowledging their experience and appreciation for their knowledge of the org.
2. Asking the direct question of "if you could say yes on your own, would you?"
3. Hidden objections come out. every. time.
Justatitle
Politicker
+11
Mid Market AE
What’s the motivation to change? You can save him money? Does he dislike what he is doing now? Essentially what’s the pain you are solving for. If it’s bad enough he’ll switch out but I don’t know if he’ll switch unless you make him clearly see the value in moving. Have an alignment call and be open to him. Say look are you serious or are we just playing tiddlywinks. 
CCP
Opinionated
+6
VP, Business Development
The pain of the same has to be greater than the pain of change for him to move. But if its a large, complex sale, 1 month doesn't seem all that long. Depends on your sales cycle, I suppose. 
SaaSguy
Politicker
+8
Account Executive
Ask to set up a call with him and IT and flesh things out, highlight the savings and let the objections he really has come to light.
UserNotFound
Politicker
+10
Mid Market Manager
I was in the copier biz for a long time, @GrindingSales and I respect that hustle! I've been in situations like this before too- it's hard, especially in such a commoditized field. 

Have you tried doing a deferred payment? Does that help pay down the buyout enough? Or do a locked CPC for the first 24M and see if that moves the needle for them? 

Another tactic I always liked to use was a lunch- I'd always throw out a "Hey I have to take someone to lunch at least once a month, would you throw me a bone and be my guest this month? Lol, you're my favorite prospect right now and since we haven't signed yet you still count!" (So many variables on who this works on, I'm assuming you have great rapport here). Then you can bring up that by the time equip gets delivered they will have made X number of payments and the new lease quote is $X, but that's leveraging a Q2 promo (or summer, or whatever hard close you want) and you don't need them to take delivery right now but you need the commit to secure the devices at the rate. 

Since copier leases don't invoice until 30-45days post delivery, he can push delivery as long as he wants, you can hit quota, and you all can move on to the next! 
UserNotFound
Politicker
+10
Mid Market Manager
I misread your original post and thought you were going to be cost-neutral. He's probably scared his IT team will be pissed at the change. Try asking him to interface with his IT Team... an example:

"Hey Jim, I know you're still considering this initiative- but while you deliberate I was hoping you could connect me with someone from your IT Team that would be a part of this rollout. We typically like to completely pre-flight machines so that everything is plug-and-play and as easy on your internal resources as possible. Would love to have a quick call with your guys to ensure that we're all same page regarding their needs out of a partnership here, and that we have plenty of time to get our ducks in a row as well!"

Also I always feel like a douche for including these types of examples of what I would say... but I know that's how I learn best. But please tell me if it's douchey. Lol. 
Th
The_Envisioneer
Sr. Director, Sales Development
Yup I agree with the negative reverse or you can close the file. 

Doesn't seem like this is a priority right now so lets go ahead and close this file.

 Pretty much going to find out how serious they are about replacing their current solution. 

Without details on how you got to this point, lots of things could be happening.

 Depending on the reasons why they are looking to replace their current solution and your comment about saving little over 3 years, I bet they are trying to get those measly savings from their current vendor to not rip and replace. I didn't see you comment on how you are filling a need or are better, just a bit more savings. 
Sh
SheCloser
Fire Starter
+2
Staring down at you from the top of the stack rankings
Can you find additional dollars to incentivize a close for this month?  Getting additional money and time stamping that could smoke him out if he’s going to make a decision or not and what the why is.  Also tie back any critical business issues you should have uncovered in the sales process.  Most time they are unrecognized dollars you could be saving your client.  What is this change going to do for their business?  Reiterate that.  Last, give that IT team a call.  Don’t chase a dead deal, it’s better to smoke them out now one way or the other so you can focus your time elsewhere.  Good luck and let us know the outcome! 
Maplepapaya
Director of Enablement
What is the compelling event for him to make the switch to your company? Was IT involved in the conversations? I would get to IT and Finance and understand what could be stopping them from deciding. I truly believe your contact is either not the DM or this person has another compelling offer, most likely from the incumbent
Ta
TallR
Account Executivee
Unfortunately, you have lost the deal and he just thinks he's being nice by not telling you directly.  The benefits of your solution aren't great enough for him to bother his IT dpt.  Sorry.
Salesup
Executive
+5
Sales Executive
You definitely need to figure out a way to pull the deal off the table.  

If you do and he doesn't buy, he's a suspect; not a prospect. Get him gone and you can spend your time on the rest of your pipeline. 
2
HELP: When to close lost an opportunity
Question
14
5
Need to close this deal by 5/28 help!
Question
6
25
Does Golfing Actually Help Close Deals?
Question
42