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Should I leave my job after 3 months?

Hi all,


About 3 months ago, I accepted a position at a job that I viewed as a huge step in my career. I went from an 75k OTE to 130k and broke into selling really complex software to c-suite executives. All in all, the transition has been challenging but positive. I like my boss, my colleagues, and I believe in the solution. On top of that, it's changed my life from a financial perspective. All the things I wasn't able to do/buy beforehand because I was trying to be responsible I can do without a second thought. In short it's been a great move.


I have a personal policy where I take interviews no matter what. Keeps me sharp and you never know what might come through. Well something big came through last week that has me questioning what to do.


Another large tech firm reached out to me asking to interview for a position on their team. At first it sounded like a lateral move until they told me starting OTE is 180k-210k (60-40 split). I took the first interview and they want me to go to the next round.


I'm at a crossroads because usually I believe we should always act in our own self interest, but I'm questioning what that is. I'd certainly burn the bridge here if I leave right after my ramping period. Should I leave something that's been so great for me and risk the next spot not working out?

๐Ÿ‘ฅ Hiring
๐Ÿค Interviewing/Offer
8
JuicyKlay
Politicker
+9
AM
I think you should continue to interview and ultimately decide what job will make you the happiest long-term. Your current company won't care if you quit after 3 months and personally I don't think recruiters or future employers will if you're a rockstar. I wouldn't recommend keeping up the pattern of leaving after 3 months but life is too short not to take leaps of faith sometimes.
poweredbycaffeine
WR Officer
+9
Bean Juice Drinker | Sales Savant
We do care if you leave after 3 months. It not only tells us we made a mistake hiring you since you're leaving for money, but it also can send ripples through an org from the top-down since execs will see it is as a "you're not good at retaining talent" move...and it puts others at risk.

To your point about recruiters or employers caring: they do if you make it a habit/pattern of moving every 6-8 months.
funcoupons
WR Officer
+11
that's queen coups to u
Why is it so bad that someone leaves for money? The main reason we all work is to make money, I don't know a single person who would volunteer to do sales for free. I'd rather an employee leave for money vs leave due to poor management or a shitty product.

I agree with your second point. OP needs to make sure he/she doesn't make short stints a habit and it's probably best to leave a three month tenure role off the resume completely.ย 
Show 5 more replies
Chep
WR Officer
+10
Business Development Team Lead
Feel out the people. Money is huge, but if you love where you're working and the people there it's not worth the extra 50-80K in the long run. That being said, I love the take every interview approach great way to stay sharp indeed!
funcoupons
WR Officer
+11
that's queen coups to u
I think if the opportunity sounds exciting, you should continue to interview. You're only going on to the second interview round, you haven't received an offer yet. Things could come up during the rest of the process that make leaving your current employer an easy yes or an easy no. Don't make any decisions until the process is complete and they're offering you a job.

If it turns out this job is better than the current, I don't think you need to worry about loyalty to your current employer. It's business - you need to do what's right for you. Leaving after three months isn't ideal, but neither is passing on a better opportunity only out of a sense of loyalty. If you were to quit and explained to your manager that an opportunity came up that you simply cannot pass up, they might be a bit surprised/bummed out you're leaving so quickly, but they're not going to hate you for it.ย 
Brbman01
Opinionated
+2
Account Executive
I guess my mindset is, if I go forward with the second interview, that means I'm serious about the job and I'll continue to pursue it until they don't want me or I find a red flag.ย 
breezyboiii
Politicker
+5
Sales Boiii
"they say the grass is greener on the other side, but the grass is greenest where you water it."
Salespreuner
Big Shot
+11
Regional Sales Director
Take interviews for experience and learning

It depends on you to decide basis culture. If in 3 months, you liked people and fit, better to stay
MMMGood
Celebrated Contributor
+10
Senior Account Executive
Sounds like it's pretty early in the process for you to worry about it. Keep interviewing...if you get an offer, then give it some more consideration. If the "new" company wants you that badly, I don't see an issue.ย 
Salespreuner
Big Shot
+11
Regional Sales Director
Money matters, but people and culture, a bit more. So choose which works best
SlinginSoftware
Politicker
+7
Account Executive
To echo most of these comments, take the interviews and worry about making a decision when you have an offer letter in hand.

I try not to job hop, but if a dream job comes up, I wouldn't worry if I have been somewhere for 5 years or 5 days. All of my decisions are based on one question - "Will this change increase the quality of life for me and for my family?".
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