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How can you spot a shitty or an average company? (when looking for a job)

Hi everyone, I’m on the job hunt, and carefully selecting my next step to avoid moving into a shitty company (which I previously did despite thorough research)


Wondered if anyone has any tips about how you select a really good company (and PRODUCT!) especially when it’s an industry you don’t know. 


Currently, this is what I’m doing: 


1- To check the company: 

  • Glassdoor (especially by region and most recent)
  • RepVue for sales ratings 
  • checking the company’s founders, senior executives and salespeople on Linkedin 
  • Crunchbase for funding information 


2- To check product-market fit (for tech companies):  

  • G2’s comparison grid, in their product category
  • Gartner’s magic quadrant, if available
  • Forrester Wave Report, if available 


Anything else that I’m missing? or anything else that you guys are doing?



👥 Hiring
🧠 Advice
🎯 Career Development
16
funcoupons
WR Officer
+12
that's queen coups to u
Interview them during the interview process. Don't be afraid to ask questions like:

- Why is this role open? Pay attention to whether they proudly cite growth or try and dodge the question, leading you to believe there's high turnover.

- How many AEs reached quota last year? How many exceeded quota/made Pres Club?

- Ask them not only why their product is superior to competition, but why a prospect might NOT want to buy their product/what objections they encounter. No company is perfect so an honest answer here can go far.

- Interview process in general. Do they get back to you in an appropriate timeframe and hold themselves accountable to deadlines? Is the interview process reasonable or do they have you jumping through hoops? Do your interviewers seem happy and engaged or are they distracted or zoned out?
Ta
Tatertot
Contributor
+1
Business Development Executive
I really love your last point there about the tone of the interviewer. I had an interview recently where (who would be my manager) was very uninterested. Seemed like he didn’t really care about the product. New thread within the company and I couldn’t help but feel like he wasn’t excited about his new role. Turned me off to the whole process in general.
funcoupons
WR Officer
+12
that's queen coups to u
For good reason! A disinterested/rude interviewer is a huge red flag. We're supposed to be giving the best sides of each other in the interview process, if your best is lukewarm what will it be like working there? Hint: not great.
skyhawk
Opinionated
+5
SDR
Amazing questions!! [hands in air emoji which I can't find here.. lol]

Will definitely apply them. Thanks! 
UrAssIsSaaS
Politicker
+8
SaaS Eater
I think youre off to a good start but I love plugging myself. This is how I decided to move to a new company.

https://bravado.co/war-room/posts/your-most-common-questions-answered-should-i-leave-my-current-role-for-x-edition
skyhawk
Opinionated
+5
SDR
Love this! plenty of good stuff in there. will definitely revise and implement some of that in my own search
UrAssIsSaaS
Politicker
+8
SaaS Eater
glad i could help
poweredbycaffeine
WR Lieutenant
+10
Bean Juice Drinker | Sales Savant
Here's a fun one I haven't seen as an answer here:

Go to LinkedIn and search for people that are 'Past Employees'. Find all of the salespeople and go look at their average tenure. If it's less than a year, start questioning everything you can about quota attainment, retention, career development, etc

Don't be afraid to show your research to them. They'll be uncomfortable, but candid.
goose
Politicker
+12
Sales Executive
Candor is a critical piece here. If they start to hide things then you know to run for the hills.
MitchandMurray
Politicker
+4
Business Development Director
I think you’re doing all the right things here. Something that I recommend is reaching out to an individual that currently has the role you’re looking to be hired into or a title or two above and asking them candidly how their experience has been and what they enjoy and dislike about the job. Oftentimes companies have internal referral bonuses if employees refer out, I’ve had people reach out to me knowing this and telling me they are going to apply and first picked my brain on the job and role and then if I’d be willing to refer them. I work for a huge company so it’s no skin off my back and I’m always happy to share my experiences, the referral bonus if they get hired doesn’t hurt either.
Fo
FormerStartupJobHopper
Big Shot
+7
AE
This is all good stuff. Ask them for quota attainment on the SDR and AE teams and don't be afraid to politely push back a little if they dodge the question. Also real numbers as to whether AE's are really getting in seats from the SDR team and how long they spent in their SDR gig? What kind of attainment you need to hit for them to give you a look?
Sunbunny31
Politicker
+5
Sales Executive
Agreed - actual quota attainment is a great indicator.  Also the career path and expected timeline.  Great points.
Diablo
Politicker
+7
AE
Apart from great points mentioned below see if you can talk to someone in the org for a quick coffee chat to understand a bit more about the org. 
CaneWolf
Politicker
+12
Call me what you want, just sign the damn contract
Look at turnover rates. How often are the sellers leaving?
skyhawk
Opinionated
+5
SDR
Good point, although a tricky topic to assess as an outsider. 

RepVue has a section for the attrition rate, but I'm not sure if it's quite accurate. Also underperformers, which sometimes isn't the company's fault, affect the attrition rate too so it needs to be taken with a pinch of salt. 

Any ways or tools you're using to find out about this? Especially when we don't have any contacts in the company.. 
CaneWolf
Politicker
+12
Call me what you want, just sign the damn contract
1. Go to LinkedIn and do a people search
2. For keywords, put part of whatever the job title is. (ex: Account Executive, put executive)
3. Put past company as the company
4. Get the results, open a bunch of the profiles
5. See how long they were at the company

Do similar for people who are currently there. If you're seeing an alarming trend of short tenure, you know not to go there.
Show 1 more replies
SaaSguy
Big Shot
+9
Account Executive
Talk to current reps! 
goose
Politicker
+12
Sales Executive
Your biggest mistake is not taking your sales leadership into account. They are your best predictor of future success. I’ve worked for decent companies with great leadership and made lots of money. I’ve also worked for really good brands and hated my job because of my manager.
AT
ATLien
Contributor
+1
AE
What are your thoughts on working for someone brand new to management? 
goose
Politicker
+12
Sales Executive
I'd rather not.  It's tough, especially if they aren't focused on the success of others.  Most new managers are in it for themselves and their own success.  There are exceptions.  Still, I'd prefer a leader.
DasPeruvian
Contributor
+2
Growth Manager
Personally I like connecting with a BDR/SDR at the company and just asking them their thoughts as well.
They let management know that you are taking the time to meet them before starting (brownie points) and if they tell you it's shit, then now you know.
skyhawk
Opinionated
+5
SDR
Not sure if it's a UK thing, but I've tried that with so many people here, and they don't even respond/accept to connect.. 
SnybaDon
Good Citizen
+2
SDR Manager
Check for previous employees on LinkedIn, reach out to them and ask for a 15min chat to get a better understanding of what life was like before they leftt
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